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What causes recurring high potassium?

High potassium (hyperkalemia) can recur over time due to a number of reasons.1

Common conditions linked with recurring high potassium are listed below.

If you are affected by any of these conditions, it is important to work with your doctor to keep track of your potassium level and reduce your risk of high potassium. 

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Find out how to monitor your
potassium level

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Some treatments can also lead to high potassium including:9-12

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Salt substitutes

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Some blood pressure treatments (e.g. lisinopril, benazepril, captopril, enalapril)

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Potassium-sparing diuretics (e.g. spironolactone, amiloride)

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Supplements 

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Some antibiotics (e.g. pentamidine, trimethoprim)

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NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen)

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Some immunosuppressants (e.g. tacrolimus, cyclosporine)

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Herbal remedies

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Salt substitutes

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Some blood pressure treatments (e.g. lisinopril, benazepril, captopril, enalapril)

Image removed.

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Potassium-sparing diuretics (e.g. spironolactone, amiloride)

Image removed.

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Supplements 

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Some antibiotics (e.g. pentamidine, trimethoprim)

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NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen)

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Some immunosuppressants (e.g. tacrolimus, cyclosporine)

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Herbal remedies

It is important that you do not stop taking your treatments as this may seriously
affect your health. You should also check with your doctor before taking any
over-the-counter medications.

Tell your doctor about all the treatments you
are taking, so they can consider how best to
manage your health 

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References

1. Dunn JD, et al. Am J Manag Care 2015;21:S307–15. 2. NHS. Heart Failure. Available at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/heart-failure/ Date accessed: November 2021. 3. Viswanathan G, et al. Int J Nephrol 2011;11:1–10. 4. Kovesdy CP, Nat Rev Nephrol 2014; 10(11):53─62. 5. NHS. Diabetes. Available at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/diabetes/ Date accessed: November 2021. 6. Kovesdy CP, Rev Endocr Metab Disord 2017;18(10):41─47. 7. Kinaan M et al. J Ren Hepat Disord 2017;1(2):10─24. 8. Turgut F, et al. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2010;5(7):1300─39. 9. Turgutalp K, et al. Ren Fail 2016;38(9):1405–12. 10. Batra V, et al. Cureus 2016;8(11):e859. 11. Hunter RW, et al. Nephrol Dial Transplant 2019;34: iii2–iii11. 12. Lee CH, et al. Electrolyte & Blood Pressure 2007;5:126–130.